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Hemeroteca Nacional: National Newspaper Archive of Mexico

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National Newspaper Archive
Photo: Rojomar on Wikimedia Commons

 

The Hemeroteca Nacional is the National Newspaper Archive (HNM). Founded in 1944, it was until 1979 the old temple of San Pedro and San Pablo which today houses the Museum of the Constitutions.

Since 1967, it’s been part of the Bibliographic Research Institute and under the National Library. It moved to the University Cultural Center when it was folded into the Bilioteca Nacional. Mexican publications begin in 1722 but there are some international publications dating from the 17th century. The reserve collections include newspapers, journals, magazines, and academic publications.

For admittance to the Biblioteca Nacional, through which the National Newspaper Archive is made accessible, readers need to show a voter ID or student ID. International visitors must present a passport.

The Biblioteca on floors one to four gives you access to the general collection, i.e.; mostly secondary sources. The fondos reservados include lots of archival collections from the colonial (Franciscan and colonial music collections) through to the 19th-century (politicians’ personal papers). These are on the ground floor in the annex building.

The Hemeroteca is also on four floors, but these ones on the right from the main entrance. You should plan on signing in unless you have an UNAM ID.

The fondos reservados of both institution require a the submission of the request form, linked from the Biblioteca wesbite,  and normally a letter of introduction, proof of residence, passport photocopy, and two passport photos. There’s also a fee of MX$40 for a library ID.

Access to the National Library of Mexico and consultation of the bibliographic material of the General Collections are free.

The National Library also offers academic and cultural activities, exhibitions, tributes, and conferences. Many are open to the public are organized.

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